Ethanol-Water Volume Correction and Mass-Volume Conversion

Alcohol volume converter

In this example the volume of the alcohol-water blend has been corrected from an actual temperature of 9C to a reference temperature of 20C. The mass of the blend and the mass of the pure alcohol contained are also calculated.


This calculator has many functions. It will


As can be seen in the screen shot above, the strength of the ethanol-water blend can be specified as a density, a mass strength, a volume strength (ABV) or as Proof @60F.

Many distillers take advantage of the additional accuracy that can be achieved by blending on a mass basis when diluting their alcohol to bottling strength. This AlcoDens calculator makes it very easy to determine the volume, and therefore the number of bottles, that will result. The details of the blend for which the volume or mass is to be calculated can be easily transferred from the blending calculator by clicking the Copy Blend button on the blending calculator and then clicking the Paste button on this calculator. This makes it very easy to calculate the absolute alcohol (LALs) or proof gallons from the measured proof, quantity (volume or weight) and temperature.

For accounting and tax purposes it is always necessary to know the volume of the alcohol stock at a particular reference temperature. To do this it is necessary to track the alcohol volume change with temperature and this calculator makes that task very simple and accurate. To accommodate the differing requirements of various countries and conventions the absolute alcohol content is given in mass and volume terms, as well as in Proof Gallons for compatibility with the TTB Tables. However, any of these calculated values that are not required can be hidden by un-ticking the "Show" button.

AlcoDens can calculate alcohol volume changes for temperatures all the way down to -20C (-4F), making it very suitable for work during winter in cold climates. Like all the AlcoDens calculators, the Volume Temperature Correction Calculator can use either the OIML (in vacuum) or the TTB (in air) model. The model currently in use is always highlighted by the button with the red text in the top right corner.